Capital Gains Income

Posted: September 22, 2011 in Nitegator

Warren Buffett recently enraged the Right by chastising Congress for “coddling” millionaires and billionaires. In a widely quoted op-ed, he urged lawmakers to “raise rates immediately on taxable income in excess of $1 million,” including capital gains. Buffett is right, but not entirely. The ideal reform would make some capital gains tax-free. For the very richest Americans, low tax rates on capital gains are better than any Christmas gift. As a result of a pair of rate cuts, first under President Bill Clinton and then under Bush, most of the richest Americans pay lower overall tax rates than middle-class Americans do. And this is one reason the gap between the wealthy and the rest of the country is widening dramatically. The rates on capital gains — which include profits from the sale of stocks, bonds and real estate — should be a key point in negotiations over how to shrink the budget deficit. If a taxpayer bought a piece of undeveloped land in 1991 for $100,000, paid property taxes for 20 years but made no changes to the property, and in 2011 sold that undeveloped land for $165,000, the taxpayer would owe capital gains tax on $65,000. But the taxpayer has experienced a gain only as far as the IRS is concerned. In those intervening 20 years, cumulative inflation was approximately 65 percent. The taxpayer has the same purchasing power with $165,000 as he or she had 20 years ago with $100,000 — but must pay taxes on the $65,000 that is attributable to inflation. The same capital gains tax is paid whether the $65,000 increase occurs over one year or 20.

In the United States, individuals and corporations pay income tax on the net total of all their capital gains just as they do on other sorts of income. Capital gains are generally taxed at a preferential rate in comparison to ordinary income (26 U.S.C. §1(h)). This is intended to provide incentives for investors to make capital investments, to fund entrepreneurial activity, and to compensate for the effect of inflation and the corporate income tax. The amount an investor is taxed depends on both his or her tax bracket, and the amount of time the investment was held before being sold. Short-term capital gains are taxed at the investor’s ordinary income tax rate, and are defined as investments held for a year or less before being sold. Long-term capital gains, which apply to assets held for more than one year, are taxed at a lower rate than short-term gains. In 2003, this rate was reduced to 15%, and to 5% for individuals in the lowest two income tax brackets. The reduced 15% tax rate on qualified dividends and long term capital gains, previously scheduled to expire in 2008, was extended through 2010 as a result of the Tax Reconciliation Act signed into law by President George W. Bush on May 17, 2006. Buffett had written in a recent New York Times op-ed titled “Stop Coddling the Super-Rich,” that he and others among the 0.3 percent wealthiest Americans pay substantially lower tax rates than other Americans, thanks to tax laws and loopholes written by Congress. Buffett noted that his federal taxes last year amounted to 17.4 percent of his taxable income – a lower rate than that paid by any of his employees, whose tax rates ranged from 33 to 41 percent. Buffett suggested there be “shared sacrifice,” by raising rates on the money the “mega-rich” earn from their investments. (Income from such investments is taxed at 10-15 percent.) Most of Buffett’s income apparently comes from dividends and from capital gains. And if you raise the tax on capital gains and dividends, you’re going to get less capital creation. We tried this in the 1970s.

President George W. Bush cut the levy on long-term gains to 15 percent. By comparison, the federal income tax alone is 25 percent on the wages of middle-class workers. Including payroll taxes and Medicare, income from work is commonly taxed at more than twice the rate as income from wealth. Advocates for a low capital gains rate say it spurs more investment in the U.S. economy, benefiting all Americans. But some tax experts say the evidence for that theory is murky at best. What is clear is that the capital gains tax rate disproportionately benefits the ultra-wealthy. Most Americans depend on wages and salaries for their income, which is subject to a graduated tax so the big earners pay higher percentages. The capital gains tax turns that idea on its head, capping the rate at 15 percent for long-term investments. As a result, anyone making more than $34,500 a year in wages and salary is taxed at a higher rate than a billionaire is taxed on untold millions in capital gains.  Advocates of tax breaks on capital gains claim that investments in the stock market grow jobs and grow the economy. For all but a trace amount of the billions of shares that change hands every day, that’s patently not true. Almost none of the money that flows through Wall Street goes to companies or grows jobs; it simply grows portfolios.

Small companies with big dreams use initial public offerings (IPOs) to help make those dreams take root and flourish. Later on, companies sometimes issue secondary offerings that raise capital for further expansion. Investing in offerings like these really does spur the economy. The money goes not into portfolios but to companies that put it to use and create jobs. The tax code—which now makes no distinction between true investments in companies and personal investments in portfolios—should recognize and reward the difference. Capital gains from true investments should become tax-free; capital gains from aftermarket investments should be taxed at the same rate as ordinary income. Under 26 U.S.C. §121 an individual can exclude up to $250,000 ($500,000 for a married couple filing jointly) of capital gains on the sale of real property if the owner used it as primary residence for two of the five years before the date of sale. The two years of residency do not have to be continuous. An individual may meet the ownership and use tests during different 2-year periods. Both tests must be satisfied during the 5-year period ending on the date of the sale. There are allowances and exceptions for military service, disability, partial residence and other reasons. The $250K ($500K married filing jointly) exemption is not increased for home ownership beyond 5 years. The $250,000 ($500,000 for a married couple filing jointly) is not available to properties bought by 1031 exchange. Capital gains on rental property can be totally avoided by using 1031 exchange. One strategy that is sometimes employed is for a homeowner to move out of the primary residence, rent it out for a period of time, evict the renters, exchange for a new house, rent the new house out, evict the new renters, and then move into the new house, thereby avoiding capital gains tax. 1031 exchange can also be used to avoid capital gains by renting out part of your principal residence.

Buffett’s call for higher taxes on ultrahigh incomes said nothing about taxing wealth income at the same rate as work income. Ronald Reagan’s Tax Reform Act of 1986 levied equal taxes on capital gains, dividends, and ordinary income such as wages. In exchange, Reagan won another round of marginal rate cuts and a reduction in tax brackets. His speech at the signing ceremony called the bill “a sweeping victory for fairness” and “the best job-creation program ever to come out of the Congress.” Reagan’s tradeoff—lower marginal rates in return for equal taxes on all income—is strikingly similar to the one proposed by both of the blue-ribbon, deficit-reduction bodies that weighed in late last year. The chairmen’s report of President Obama’s fiscal commission (Simpson/Bowles) and a plan from the Bipartisan Policy Center (Rivlin/Domenici) both called for lower marginal rates. Likewise, both came down in favor of equal taxes on all income.

Here are ten facts from the IRS about gains and losses and how they can affect your Federal income tax return.

1. Almost everything you own and use for personal purposes, pleasure or investment is a capital asset.

2. When you sell a capital asset, the difference between the amount you sell it for and your basis – which is usually what you paid for it – is a capital gain or a capital loss.

3. You must report all capital gains.

4. You may deduct capital losses only on investment property, not on property held for personal use.

5. Capital gains and losses are classified as long-term or short-term, depending on how long you hold the property before you sell it. If you hold it more than one year, your capital gain or loss is long-term. If you hold it one year or less, your capital gain or loss is short-term.

6. If you have long-term gains in excess of your long-term losses, you have a net capital gain to the extent your net long-term capital gain is more than your net short-term capital loss, if any.

7. The tax rates that apply to net capital gain are generally lower than the tax rates that apply to other income. For 2010, the maximum capital gains rate for most people is 15%. For lower-income individuals, the rate may be 0% on some or all of the net capital gain. Special types of net capital gain can be taxed at 25% or 28%.

8. If your capital losses exceed your capital gains, the excess can be deducted on your tax return and used to reduce other income, such as wages, up to an annual limit of $3,000, or $1,500 if you are married filing separately.

9. If your total net capital loss is more than the yearly limit on capital loss deductions, you can carry over the unused part to the next year and treat it as if you incurred it in that next year.

10. Capital gains and losses are reported on Schedule D, Capital Gains and Losses, and then transferred to line 13 of Form 1040.

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